Tips and Picks for purchasing artwork

Good art that fits into an already designed room can be VERY hard to find. Unlike furniture and lighting, which should be both functional and decorative, art is purely decorative. Everyone's aesthetic tastes are different and artwork can be quite expensive, so there is a lot of pressure for you to really love the pieces in your home. 

With my art background, it's probably no surprise that I often draw inspiration from the art world for my own designs. I've even filled my own home with a large variety of art - paintings I've found from Goodwill, sculptural figures from my travels, beautiful pottery, family heirlooms and my own creations. I love almost all types of artwork and personally want to surround myself in things I like. The more the better! 

If you love artwork but don't have the time or funds to purchase from galleries and auction houses, then don't worry - you can now browse artwork online through a variety of sites (see image source credits below). While gathering images for this post, I was literally finding artwork while watching Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt on Netflix... 

To help you in your artwork hunt, consider the following tips: 

  1. Go big. Skip the 8"x10" prints, they're too small to make an impact in your home and run the risk of looking generic. 
  2. Try buying a standard size. This will help save you money on framing, which can be shockingly expensive. Check IKEA or Target before going to a specialty framing shop. With that said, if you invested a lot of money in a painting, then it could make sense to have it professionally framed (these shops really do a nice job).
  3. Buy original. Sure, I have some amazing Modigliani and Picasso prints that I wouldn't have been able to buy original, but I also mix the classic works in with original works from emerging artists. A collection with just reproductions can seen incomplete, especially if you really value and support the arts. Buying from emerging artists also gives your collection a chance to appreciate over time; who knows, maybe you are buying the next Warhol. 
  4. Make a statement. Don't let all of your artwork fade into the background. At least one piece should be a statement or conversational piece in your home. This doesn't necessarily have to be a graphic graffiti piece, but can be something personal to you.   
  5. Don't get freaked out by pricing. Buying original can sometimes be expensive. But, if you really love the piece and you value artwork in your home, then just remember that you are paying for years of talent, training, and honing of vision. 

If you want to spruce up your home this spring by bringing new artwork into your home, then take a look at my top picks below. Which is your favorite? 

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Do you need more assistance in selecting, purchasing and framing your new artwork? Contact me today and I can lend a hand.